500

EDU 501 Advanced Study: Child Psychology

Methods for observing and measuring child behavior. Principles of research in the study of children. Study of contemporary areas of concern in child development including psychological consequences of marital discord, day care, television, paternal behavior, and family size.

3

EDU 502 Psychology of Adolescence

Influence of physical, sexual, and social factors upon total personality during adolescence. Relationship to formation of attitudes toward self and others. Social, emotional, intellectual, and vocational adjustment demanded of youth in contemporary life.

3

EDU 503 Evaluation in the Schools

Practical applications of evaluation theory in the schools: preparation and use of teacher-made tests; selection, administration, and interpretation of standardized tests; the use of assessment data in school-related decision-making.

3

EDU 504 The Exceptional Learner

Introduces teachers to instructional approaches for meeting the needs of exceptional learners. Addresses practical considerations regarding placement options, instructional adaptations, and effective use of support services.

3

EDU 505 The Process of Writing: K-12

Examination of the writing process with emphasis on the theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of composition. Details the importance and role of audience, voice, focus, prewriting, conferencing, peer editing, assessment, purpose, and mechanics. Participants write in several modes as part of observation and study of their own composing strategies, including an investigation of the stage or step model of writing.

3

EDU 506 Introduction to Literacy Instruction

The course is designed to provide an overview of literacy (reading, writing, viewing, speaking, listening, thinking) as a developmental process. It includes models of literacy that support learning and instruction, as well as addressing issues concerning emergent literacy, planning and evaluation, and programs funded at the state and federal levels.

3

EDU 507 Group Processes in Education

Implications of individual group relationships for teachers and administrators with respect to more effective teaching, higher student motivation, leadership identification and development, school climate and organizational development.

3

EDU 508 Teaching Exceptional Learners in Inclusive Settings

Addresses evidence-based instructional approaches, curriculum adaptation, placement options, and effective use of support services for exceptional learners, with an emphasis on instructional approaches to support them in inclusive settings and in the general education curriculum.

3

EDU 509 Teaching of Thinking

Study of an overall framework of teaching of and about thinking and teacher behaviors which create classroom conditions for thinking. Basic approaches to the teaching of thinking skills are explored through current programs, systems, and resources.

3

EDU 513 Literacy in the Content Areas

The course explores reading and writing in discipline-specific areas including science, social studies, and mathematics. The course also places a strong emphasis on close reading of expository texts and analysis of test data as a tool for planning instruction.

3

EDU 514 Assessmentand Instruction of Diverse Learners I

Addresses proven formal and informal approaches to be used by educators and related services professionals in identifying and teaching exceptional learners, with an emphasis on measurement strategies that inform their effective instruction.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 508*

Cross Listed Courses

* Indicates that the course can be taken in the same semester

EDU 515 Dramatic Experiences in Elementary School

The course will examine the history of dramatic experiences in the K-6 public school system, including oral and dramatic traditions in cultures around the world. Children's/adolescent literature titles will be the catalyst to develop projects that include storytelling and dramatic activities.

3

EDU 516 Improving Educational Outcomes: Working with Children and Families from Poverty

This Linking Content to Pedagogy course provides an in-depth study of the culture of poverty (in contrast to middle class) using research-based frameworks. Candidates will explore characteristics of poverty and social class and relate these characteristics to academic readiness and success in order to develop classroom tools, interventions, and resources for use with P-12 children and their families.

3

EDU 517 Types of English Language Learners

In this special topics course, participants will have the chance to learn about the various "types" of English language learners (ELLs). Often, people assume that ELLs are children who just need to learn the English language and are in K-12 school settings. While this definition can be true, it is limited in its scope for its lack of recognizing the various influences and contexts in which people are and can be classified as ELLs. Further, not all ELLs have had or are in K-12 settings. Therefore, this course is designed to introduce students to the various types of ELLs. This may include all or most of the following: (a) long-term ELLs; (b) (im)migrants; (c) adults; and (d) refugees, newcomers and students with interrupted formal education (SIFE). The goal of this course is to introduce anyone interested in learning about these various "types" of ELLs to the defining characteristics of each group, to rectify any myths and misunderstandings about who ELLs are while digging into the controversial group labeling that can exist, and to examine and discover pertinent influences which may impact language acquisition and ELLs' ability to be included as full members of society (whether in school or workplace environments).

3

EDU 518 Second Language Acquisition and Development

This course will help teacher educators better understand second language acquisition (SLA) in order to help them with their lesson planning and delivery in instructing English language learners (ELLs). Students will become knowledgeable about the various social, psychological, and linguistic theories and approaches to SLA and be able to apply this knowledge to their teaching practices. This course will also explore first language acquisition, developmental stages of SLA, as well as present the various individual factors which help to explain differences between and within language learners. Since ELLs are diverse, and their language learning needs are specific to themselves, educators must understand the various means and ways in which languages are learned and acquired in order to be reflective, responsive practitioners.

3

EDU 519 Curriculum Theory for the Second Language Classroom - ESL I

Discusses basic curriculum theory, providing models of curriculum development and their application to Pre K-12 classrooms, with an emphasis on constructivist, student-centered theories. Emphasizes basic curriculum theory for the English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom, providing an analysis of curriculum models for ESL and bilingual education. Basic methods of ESL are used, as students apply theory to classroom practice through research and projects. N.Y.S.E.D. Standards for ESL and the N.Y.S.E.D. ELA Standards applied to ELL students provide the basis for curriculum work. Infuses technology and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in methodology.

3

Corequisites

EDU 521

EDU 520 Curriculum Framework Theory/Development

Core graduate course for the Curriculum and Instruction master's degree specialization explores the people and changes impacting the history of curriculum in the U. S. Students will develop a usable curriculum/instructional framework following acceptable curriculum development practice.

3

EDU 521 Practicum in TESOL I

Required for students enrolled in EDU 519 Curriculum Theory for the Second Language Classroom-ESL 1. Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 519

EDU 525 Curriculum Framework Integration/Innovation

Builds on EDU 520. Curriculum issues and development course, students analyze current developments in the field of curriculum and instruction. Students develop an innovative curriculum framework integrating many content frameworks and innovative techniques.

3

EDU 526 Middle School Curriculum

Study of the philosophy, organization, and curriculum of the middle school. Emphasis on the role of the teacher in the middle school. Research and experimental models are examined.

3

EDU 528 Technology in the Schools

The course is designed to introduce education personnel to the techniques and equipment involved in the use and development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A preliminary introduction to the microcomputer will be a part of the course. The role of both CAI and computer-managed instruction will be explored, including the possibilities of record management, analysis of student performance, and the development of original CAI materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of "high level, user- friendly" languages such as PILOT and LOGO.

3

EDU 529 Proactive Approaches to Classroom Management in Inclusive Settings

Focus on research-based positive approaches to the prevention of and intervention on academic and social challenges of P-12 students with disabilities. Principles of classroom structure and organization, classroom management, positive proactive behavior management, and school-wide discipline plans are emphasized, with a basis in current research.

3

Cross Listed Courses

EDU 508 and EDU 514

EDU 530 Assessment and Instruction of Diverse Learners II

Case study-based approach to issues of instructional planning, instructional delivery, analysis of student performance, and teacher reflection and response. Incorporates the "Planning, Instructing, Reflecting, Responding model" adopted by Fredonia's Professional Education Unit.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 508 and EDU 514

EDU 531 Philosophy of Education

This course will provide candidates in a variety of content areas with the opportunity to explore the philosophical, historical, cultural and social foundations of educational thought relevant to their areas of pedagogical focus.

3

EDU 535 School and Society

Analysis of the school in relation to other socializing influences. Examines cultural change and its effect upon education; the school in relation to specific problems of changing American communities; and research on teaching as an occupation.

3

EDU 536 Adolescent Literacies, Literature and Technology

The course provides an overview of multiple literacies associated with adolescents, including the theory and research base. It examines young adult literature from the perspectives of critical literacy and censorship, and it explores media literacy and technology, with a special emphasis on computers and writing. The course also develops means for assisting struggling adolescent readers, especially those from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

3

EDU 538 Cultural Literature

The course takes a transcultural/global approach to the promotion of literacy. Focusing on juvenile and children's literature - as well as on literature applicable to adolescents - the course exposes course participants to world literature. Within an in-depth global exploration of culture and values, students will glean intercultural awareness, stretching literacy beyond U.S. national borders. Using sound instructional practice and theory, participants will read novels written by international child protagonists. Participants will generate annotated bibliographies that will enrich classroom libraries and promote literacy at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

3

EDU 539 Current Issues and Problems in Education

Addresses identification, definition, and analysis of problems and issues facing education today; current criticisms of public schools; responsibilities of the schools; questions of curriculum development; and how well schools are teaching basic skills.

3

EDU 540 Content Area English as a Second Language

This course explores Sheltered English Instruction by studying and using the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) as a model for sheltered instruction. Participants in the course will learn how to deliver high-quality and effective sheltered instruction and how to create instructional materials using this model. The ultimate goal of this course is to explore the different content areas in both school and the work place to be able to translate instruction into meaningful learning. Studying sheltered instruction offers teacher candidates a model for lesson planning and implementation that provides English learners with access to grade-level content standards. Emphasis will be placed on the academic language demands required by the state of New York as articulated in the Common Core and English Language Proficiency Standards documents. This course has a co-requisite.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 519

Corequisites

EDU 541

EDU 541 Practicum in TESOL II

Required for students enrolled in EDU 540 Content Area English as a Second Language. Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 540

EDU 542 Evidence-Based Practices for Inclusive Settings

Evidence-Based Practices for Inclusive Settings meets new legislative and legal mandates for educators to provide their students with "scientifically-based" instructional practices for improving academic and behavioral performance. This course will help practitioners to link their respective academic "content" with"evidence-based" pedagogical practices.

3

EDU 543 Education for Gifted and Talented Students

Focuses on development and implementation of educational programs for optimum growth of gifted/talented students, inclusive of curriculum content; organization of special schools and classes; teaching materials and methods; and the evaluation and administrative adjustments.

3

EDU 544 Secondary School (Adolescence) Curriculum

Study of secondary curriculum, inclusive of new mandates; emerging practices; varied viewpoints; relevant research; programs; and the roles of classroom teacher and school administrator in curriculum development.

3

EDU 545 History of American Education

Historical interpretation of American education. Characteristics of American colonial education and significant developments in American elementary, secondary, and higher education during the 19th and 20th centuries.

3

EDU 546 Models of Classroom Management

Designed to expand traditional understanding of classroom management that focuses on discipline and behavioral problems. The course follows a comprehensive classroom management approach, focusing on areas of knowledge and skills that teachers need in order to be effective classroom managers.

3

EDU 548 Practicum in International Teaching

The course provides an opportunity to expand and practice teaching skills in an international setting. Participants will gain information on an educational system different from their own, gain experiences with the traditions and cultural values of the host country, and participate in classrooms where they can observe, assist, and teach. On-site U.S. faculty will assign readings to complement the practical experiences and will lead discussion seminars on topics and themes associated with the international experience.

3

EDU 551 Foundations of Teaching Indigenous Languages: Theory, History, Programs

Foundations of Teaching Indigenous Languages: Theory, History, Programs provides the basic history, theories, issues, and concepts related to teaching Indigenous languages. This course will cover varieties of language reclamation models, history, policy and politics of Indigenous language, as well as issues in teaching and learning Indigenous languages. This course focuses both on international and national perspectives by providing examples of endangered and reclaimed languages from around the world. This course flows from the topic of language endangerment to language reclamation in the Americas to a local New York perspective on indigenous language endangerment/reclamation. Topics such as policies and politics, linguistic human rights, and new domains for Indigenous languages will be a focus of this course.

3

EDU 552 Introduction to Literacy Assessment

The course investigates the nature and process of literacy assessment, with an eye to the diagnosis of literacy difficulties. The course requires Candidates to develop competence in using a wide variety of literacy assessments and analyzing data in order to identify reading and writing problems.

3

EDU 553 Citizenship Education: Moral-Legal Education

Curriculum planning and revision, kindergarten through twelfth grade, as it relates to the moral-legal dilemmas facing teachers and students today. Elements include: (1) law-related education; (2) various theoretical positions regarding moral development; (3) moral dilemmas (case studies) drawn from schools; and (4) curricular implications and revisions needed.

3

EDU 555 Methods of Bilingual Education

Reviews, discusses, and analyzes teaching methods and techniques used in core subject areas (mathematics, science, and social studies) in bilingual education classrooms in the United States. Assessment strategies as integral parts of teaching methodology are discussed (e.g., portfolios will develop and teach reading and/or writing lessons using strategies, peer groups and self-assessments). Emphasis is on methods and techniques using the language in which the bilingual extension is sought. The course includes suggestions for coordination with ESL content area instruction. Students produce and carry out lessons in the various subject areas. Required course for candidates pursuing a New York State Bilingual Education Extension; recommended for teachers working with English Language Learners.

3

EDU 556 Teaching Language Arts in Spanish

Focuses on teaching approaches and methodology used in the development of literacy skills by Spanish speaking students in the U.S. Emphasizes the understanding of the active interaction of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the process of acquiring and mastering communication skills. Reviews and analyzes current technology and curricular materials used to teach the language arts. Students will develop and teach reading and/or writing lessons using course materials. Required for teachers pursuing a New York State Bilingual Education extension.

3

EDU 557 Methods of Instruction and Assessment for Teaching Indigenous Languages

Methods of Instruction for Teaching Indigenous Languages provides students with the opportunity to learn about the various methods and practices related to teaching Indigenous/endangered and less commonly taught languages. Participants will learn about program models and methods which have been used in successful language reclamation situations, as well as practices which are currently being used today for those languages which are considered endangered and in need of reclamation. Models discussed will include, but are not limited to, the following: immersion, intergenerational and Master-Apprentice models, bi/multilingual programs, summer institutes, and other school or community-based initiatives used by Indigenous People throughout the United States and the world.

3

EDU 561 Contemporary Issues in Parent/Teacher Relationships

Focuses on building successful partnerships with families with diverse structures. Identifies models of family involvement in schools; strategies for increasing family involvement in classrooms; current educational mandates; implications for schools; and relevant research.

3

EDU 562 Infant Development and Education

Focuses on nutritional and psychological influences on prenatal, infant, and toddler growth and development, inclusive of current research in infant development; childbirth; breastfeeding; infant simulation; intellectual development; attachment behavior; and infants in group care.

3

EDU 563 Cultural Perspectives

Explores cultural awareness and diversity-related issues both in classrooms and the workplace, with a social sciences approach. Uses ethnographic investigations, document-based analysis, and cultural instruments to explore the diverse reality of today's classrooms and schools. Explores constructivist, student-centered, and equitable learning formats.

3

EDU 564 Linguistics for ESL Educators

Educating English language learners (ELLs) is complex, and having a further understanding of linguistics will help teacher educators to enhance their lesson planning and delivery in instructing ELLs of various backgrounds. Educational professionals will most likely encounter situations where having familiarity with aspects of linguistics will better enable one to practice one’s profession. This course presents the conceptual foundations of linguistics, examines structural/functional properties of language, and discusses the rules and principles which govern natural language (e.g., morphology, phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics). Other aspects of linguistics, such as language change, language processing (psycholinguistics) and elements of linguistics which impact language acquisition will also be explored. Further, the concept of Academic Language (AL) is discussed and the implications of AL on teaching practices is explored in relation to ELLs across the core content areas. Overall, this course will explore the core areas of linguistics, help educators “do linguistics” and make linguistics applicable to a language learning classroom via activities, exercises, and projects. Students will be able to apply this new linguistic knowledge to their teaching practices, particularly when working with ELLs.

3

EDU 565 Language and Learning: Psycho- and Sociolinguistic Considerations for Educators of ELL Students

This course will help teacher educators in understanding how language is used and how language functions both within and outside of classroom walls. The course will investigate topics such as globalization and the relationship between language and social settings, including language and gender, identity, ethnicity, and culture. The course will study how language is used globally, in a variety of local/global situations (e.g., World English, language variation), and will examine language use critically (e.g., power, discourse, policy). A wide range of topics in this course will address many of the sociolinguistic phenomena described above, and may include the following: heritage language maintenance, language contact, investment, imagined communities, dialects and idiolects, discourse, language policy, digital literacies, and language socialization. This course will help future educators distinguish and form opinions on these key topics, and discover how sociopolitical, sociocultural, and sociolinguistic elements can affect language learning and language use in and outside of the classroom. Educators will come to understand the broad spectrum of English language in use, the complexities associated with the multiple varieties of English, and how this may impact their classroom in order to be reflective, responsive practitioners.

3

EDU 567 Practicum in TESOL III

Required for students enrolled in EDU 569 Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners (ELLs). Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 569

EDU 568 Foundations of Bilingual Education

This course provides the basic theories, issues, and concepts related to teaching in culturally diverse classrooms where students’ first language is not English. Focuses on U.S. bilingual education in terms of historical, theoretical, and practice/methods used in schools. This course explores bilingual education from the 1960s to the present, Federal legislation (Title VII, Title III), the No Child Left Behind Act, Supreme and lower court decisions, state legislation, Bilingual Special Education, and other legal aspects. Emphasis is placed on the design and effectiveness of a variety of bilingual education program models such as one-way and two-way immersion, indigenous language immersion, and other program models of bilingual education. Participants apply knowledge of the relevant federal and state standards documents pertaining to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse populations such as the NYS Bilingual Common Core Standards, and conduct independent field and library research.

3

EDU 569 Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners (ELLs)

This course allows participants to view current school-based assessments through psychometric and socio-cultural models of assessment focusing on how schools measure language and achievement for ELLs. Through a unified theory of construct validity, participants will identify the purpose, instrument, method, and the use of assessments and evaluations most appropriate and valid for ELLs. This course explores relationships of assessment to instruction, data driven instruction (DDI), consequences of assessments, test score interpretation, state and federal assessment policies, and those assessments unique for ELLs. Teacher candidates learn how to develop assessment instruments aligned with Bilingual Common Core and English Language Proficiency Standards as well as develop a conceptual understanding of basic psychometric concepts (grade level equivalent, percentile rank, cut-off scores, standard error of measurement) and how best to apply these concepts in schools with ELLs. This course has a co-requisite 25-hour field placement practicum.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 519

Corequisites

EDU 567

EDU 570 Using Educational Research to Improve Instruction

Assists educational practitioners to become knowledgeable consumers of research and evaluation reports by helping them critically analyze and evaluate research. It examines the nature of reasoning in educational research, the use of measurement procedures in quantifying traits, the role of design in testing hypotheses, the role of statistics in analyzing data, and the limitations inherent in generalizing the results of research studies. Should be taken in the first 9 hours of graduate study.

3

EDU 574 Multicultural Children's Literature & Technology

The course provides an overview of children's literature from the perspectives of genre, critical literacy, censorship, readability, instructional resource, and multiculturalism. The course also examines literature in non-print forms both for reading and as a product of student writing. The course emphasis is on using a variety of materials and multicultural texts to assist student readers and writers from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds

3

EDU 576 Practicum in Literacy for All Students

The course is a field-based practicum taken at the same time as the Social Foundations of Literacy course. It provides Candidates with a minimum of 25 hours of practicum in intervention and coaching within formal educational settings wherein Candidates apply and practice what they learn in the co-requisite course about identifying ad assisting all types of diverse students.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 552

Corequisites

EDU 579

EDU 579 Foundations of Literacy

The course presents knowledge about basic psychological and social foundations of reading, writing, spelling, speaking, listening, and viewing. It addresses linguistic, cognitive, psychological, and sociological components that are essential for Candidates to know in order to provide literacy instruction and intervention to the increasingly diverse group of learners in today's classrooms. The course also prepares Candidates to take the New York State Content Specialty Test (CST) for Literacy.

3

EDU 580 Teaching Grades 7-12

Practical suggestions for teacher working in secondary school, with a focus on materials and teaching procedures for specific units of work such as: teaching as problem-solving, evaluation strategies, instructional techniques, and recent developments in educational thinking and practice that have affected the curriculum. Special attention to selected topics according to needs and interest of participants. Note: A selected area is to be designated: General, English, Mathematics, Foreign Languages, Science, or Social Studies.

3

EDU 583 Literacy Interventionist Practicum I

The course is one of four practicum courses to train Candidates as reading specialists who provide reading intervention through individualized, assessment-based and learner-orientated instruction. Candidates learn to administer literacy assessments, track results, and use the data to develop interventions, write lesson plans, and work with struggling readers.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 506 and EDU 552

EDU 585 Adolescent Literature

The course provides an overview of critical issues on various types of young adult literature, including forms of media that represent literature. Candidates will examine historical and contemporary literature, both fiction and non-fiction. They will also identify and select appropriate reading materials, and teaching strategies to meet diverse needs of adolescent students, based on socio-cultural and academic backgrounds.

1.5

EDU 588 Learning to Write: Pre K - Grade 6

Candidates engage interactively in various activities, discussions and readings about the development of writing skills and strategies in Pre K - 6. Current state standards, text types, appropriate teaching strategies for diverse learners, and assessment will be addressed.

3

EDU 589 Writing in the Middle and Secondary Schools

Candidates engage interactively in various activities, discussions and readings about the development of writing skills and strategies in secondary schools. Current state standards, text types, appropriate teaching strategies for diverse learners, and assessment will be discussed.

3

EDU 591 Special Topics: Curriculum and Instruction

In-depth exploration of selected topics in professional education, with emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction. Principal focus of the course varies.

3

EDU 592 Special Topics: Language, Learning, and Leadership

In-depth exploration of selected topics in professional education, with emphasis on Language, Learning, and Leadership. Principal focus of the course varies.

3

EDU 598 Special Education Considerations for Assessment of English Language Learners

This course presents current research in the identification of English Language Learners (ELLs) with special needs. The main focus of this course is the use of appropriate language development and disability. Participants will make appropriate intervention, referral, and placement decisions regarding ELLs. Participants will also be able to list key legal restraints on assessing ELLs for Special Education placements. A broad context of legal, historical, sociopolitical and out of school factors (OSFs) affecting the schooling of culturally and linguistically diverse students will be explored. All participants will develop a portfolio of assessment methods for the use in describing student performance in both content areas and language development before diagnosis.

3

EDU 599 edTPA Development and Support

This variable credit course is offered as a support course for post-baccalaureate applicants who need to complete all or part of the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) for Initial Teacher Certification in New York State. Enrollees will be provided with supports sanctioned by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) in completing edTPA and submitting to Pearson for evaluation. Enrollees planning to submit an entire edTPA will enroll for three credits, whereas those who enroll to resubmit a single task for edTPA will enroll for one credit.

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