EDU - Education

EDU 100 Tutoring Theory Practice

The course is designed to lead practicing tutors into an examination, through readings and discussion of what tutoring is, why and how it works and what tutoring can and cannot accomplish in a college setting. Because the course is designed to run concurrently with practical tutoring, candidates need to apply to and be accepted by College Tutoring Services. Acceptance is based on transcript, faculty evaluation and interviews and takes place during the semester prior to that during which the course is taken. In order to earn 2 credit hours, students must attend a series of five workshops with planned activities and discussion designed to lead to greater cultural self-awareness and therefore awareness of other peoples' cultural selves.

1-2

EDU 101 First Field Experience

Adolescence Education majors are introduced to teaching by enrolling in a 25-hour observation participation experience.

0

EDU 102 Reading Tutor Training I

EDU 102 is a one credit course designed to familiarize students with the educational setting of tutoring and with the requirements of being a reading tutor. This training program is designed to develop the range of skills needed to help children learn how to read at the independent level, to improve their reading skills, and to become confident in their reading abilities. The focus of the early training sessions will be on gaining knowledge of basic components of the reading process as well as specific reading strategies used by children at different ages, and activities tutors can use with elementary school children. Tutors will work with school children at least two hours a week. Eligible tutors may receive Work Study funding for their tutoring.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 105

EDU 103 Reading Tutor Training II

EDU 103 is a one credit course designed to provide students with some advanced training as reading tutors. This advanced training reviews all aspects of being a tutor and reading tutor as presented in Training 1, and adds the component of systematic assessment for progress monitoring of reading development. The focus of the course will continue to be learning and selecting reading strategies for use by elementary school children at different ages and ability levels. Tutors will work with school children at least two hours a week. Eligible tutors may receive Work Study funding for their tutoring.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 102

EDU 105 Introduction to Contemporary Inclusive Education

Introduction to childhood and early childhood education, its principles and practices. Organization of elementary schools, planning, teaching styles, classroom management, and instructional materials are among the topics considered. Direct teaching experiences with children are an integral part of the course.

3

Corequisites

EDU 106

EDU 106 Practicum in Inclusive Education I

Provides participants an opportunity to observe classroom operations, observe and describe the many roles of teachers, conduct focused observations and interviews, conduct two formal lessons with individuals, and small or large groups of children on a teaching learning project.

1

Corequisites

EDU 105

EDU 110 Education Literature/Composition

An integration of how one writes and how one can effectively teach writing to students. Using the writing workshop approach, the courses examines principles, teaching methodologies, and techniques pertaining to the writing process from both the perspective of writer and teacher.

3

EDU 200 Statistics

Elements of probability theory; fundamental concepts and techniques of statistics with application. May not be repeated for credit. Note: Credit for at most one of the following courses may be applied towards a student's requirements for graduation: BUAD 200, ECON 200, EDU 200, POLI 200, SOC 200, and STAT 200.

3

EDU 214 Introduction to Children's Literature

Designed to assist students in becoming widely acquainted with the great wealth of trade (library) books and media available for today's children, preschool through middle school. Course content includes all literary types.

3

EDU 215 Education in American Society

Foundations course in the study of education. Introduction to social, historical, and philosophical foundations of education and the relationship between school and society.

3

EDU 218 Children's Literature in Literacy Instruction

This course is an introduction to Children's Literature in Reading and includes a study of genre as well as discussion of literacy acquisition, reading instruction and use of children's literature for evaluation and remediation of reading difficulties.

3

EDU 220 Child Development

Development of the child from beginning of life: prenatal development through age 12. Study of physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and moral development of the child. Credit will not be given for both EDU 220 and EDU 225.

3

EDU 221 Introduction to Early Childhood Education

The course examines early childhood care and education with particular emphasis on center-based settings for children Birth-5 years. Topics include theories of child development that inform best practices, characteristics of quality care and education ("educare"), developmentally appropriate curriculum (with an emphasis on how children learn through play in well-prepared environments), appropriate assessment for young children (with an emphasis on observation), and strategies to build strong family partnerships.

3

Prerequisites

(EDU 105 and EDU 106) and (EDU 220 or EDU 225)

Corequisites

EDU 222

EDU 222 Practicum in Early Childhood

The field experience explores early childhood care and education with particular emphasis on center-based settings for children Birth-5 years. Early Childhood and Early Childhood/Childhood majors will gain experience interacting with and guiding the youngest children in early learning settings. The primary purpose of the early field experience is to provide teacher candidates with a carefully mentored experience to help develop and enhance the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to positively impact student learning and development. This experience is for two hours, twice a week, for eight weeks. The placements are in high quality educare settings.

1

Corequisites

EDU 221

EDU 224 Adolescent Development

Physical, mental, and emotional influences on adolescent development in terms of habits, interests and social adjustment. Factors in home and school that influence adolescent behavior and personality, and procedures for evaluating relevant research.

3

EDU 225 Child Development

In this course, students explore the natural sequence of growth and development from birth through pre-adolescence, with emphasis on the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social dimensions. Students also investigate why and how we study children: research issues and themes, research designs and methodologies, and research evaluation and ethics in the social sciences.

3

EDU 226 The Earth As A System

In today's world, with increasing global population, shifting climate and a growing demand for raw materials and energy, a basic understanding of the earth as a system is more important than ever. ESS aims to illustrate the interconnectedness and complexities of the planet's principal subsystems of hydrologic, atmospheric, biologic and geologic processes and their impact on shaping the planet and the lives of humans.

3

EDU 227 The Electronic Classroom

An introduction to computer managed instruction, computer based instruction, and the design and use of multimedia resources in the classroom.

3

EDU 250 Introduction to the Exceptional Learner

Introductory survey of nature, needs, and education of children who are exceptional because of intelligence, behavioral disorders, and/or physical development.

3

Prerequisites

(EDU 105 and EDU 106) or (MAED 105 and MAED 106) or (SCED 105 and SCED 106) or ENED 101 or ENGL 101

Corequisites

EDU 251

EDU 251 Practicum in Inclusive Education II

Candidates work directly with pupils with learning difficulties in area schools and agencies.

1

Corequisites

EDU 250

EDU 275 Introduction to the Teaching of Reading in the Elementary School

Introduction to techniques, activities, and materials employed in teaching elementary school candidates how to read. Focuses on traditional texts and reading materials, as well as hands-on experience in applying microcomputers in the teaching of reading. The use of writing as a technique in the teaching of reading will also be employed. Specifically designed to prepare students for participation in elementary school classrooms.

3

EDU 276 Literacy and Technology in Inclusive Educational Settings

Overview of the processes involved in literacy acquisition and the instructional approaches that acknowledge current thinking. Relationship of reading and writing, and aspects of writing development and writing process appropriate to each stage of reading development. Topics: models of reading and writing conceptual and methodological issues related to instruction and acquisition of reading, the role and use of technology in literacy instruction, assessment of candidates' reading and writing, diversity in reading acquisition - the role of technology in facilitating reading and writing for diverse learners.

3

EDU 295 Introduction to Educational Assessment

This Assessment Course is intended to introduce teacher candidates to concepts and vocabulary of assessment, as well as the assessment process from choice of assessment through to interpreting and reporting of results. The course is part of the undergraduate education sequence. It should be taken early in the education program, preferably the first semester of the sophomore year either prior to or at same time as EDU 250 or EDU 221. Later courses in the sequence contain more discipline-specific components of assessment: EDU 355 examines assessment for inclusive education, EDU 405 and 406 for literacy, and EDU 221 for early childhood.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 105 and EDU 106

EDU 300 Safe Schools/Healthy Students

Identifying and reporting suspected child abuse and maltreatment; preventing child abduction; preventing alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse; providing safety education; providing instruction in fire and arson prevention; and preventing and intervening in school violence. The course meets the requirements for New York State certification based on the statutory requirements found in the Commissioner's Regulations subdivision 52.21.

3

EDU 303 Safe Schools/Healthy Students-DASA: Safety Education/Fire and Arson/School Violence

The course is designed to provide pre-service teachers (B-12) with an introduction to essential concepts in fire safety, school violence prevention, and the social patterns of harassment, bullying and discrimination. Students will develop their knowledge through Internet assignments, assigned readings, situational analysis, group discussion, video and lecture.

1

EDU 304 Safe Schools & Healthy Students

The course provides mandated information and instruction regarding school violence prevention and intervention, regarding child abuse detection and reporting, child abduction prevention, and regarding alcohol, tobacco, drug abuse prevention at the local, state, and federal levels of education and the law. The course also examines the role of the classroom teacher in all such reporting and prevention efforts.

1

EDU 305 Cultural & Linguistic Diversity of Students and Families

An introduction to basic concepts, theories, and issues involving multicultural education, cultural diversity, and the educational system. Emphasis is on the development of a sound theoretical framework from which practical application to classroom situations will evolve. Candidates will teach, interact with, and/or observe children and youth from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds and employ a variety of teaching strategies.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 250 and EDU 105

Corequisites

EDU 313

EDU 312 Infant and Toddler Care and Education

The course examines learning environments for children ages Birth to 3 with particular emphasis on center based settings. Topics include a review of infant/toddler development, characteristics of quality education, developmentally appropriate curriculum in developmental areas, guidance based on observation and family dynamics and relations affecting infant development and growth, and parenting/teaching strategies.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 105

EDU 313 Practicum in Inclusive Education III

Required for students enrolled in EDU 305 Cultural and Linguistic Diversity. Students spend seven to eight weeks in elementary and secondary classrooms, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings. Students will be paired to enable peer coaching and peer assisted learning to occur. Students will develop an instructional unit, and teach sample lessons; for small groups or entire classes, and incorporate multicultural concepts, including culture awareness; tolerance and acceptance; cooperative learning; multiple intelligence theory; and multicultural literature, among others.

1

Corequisites

EDU 305

EDU 314 Developmental Learning

The course is designed to familiarize the beginning teacher with various developmental and learning theories, instructional implications relating to each theory, and classroom application of relevant principles.

3

EDU 315 Early Childhood Curriculum Development

A methods class designed to help candidates further their knowledge and skills to plan and implement developmentally appropriate learning activities for young children (birth - age 8). Emphasis on integrated curriculum planning to meet developmental needs of young learners.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 221 or EDU 312

EDU 321 Teaching in the Middle School

Principles, materials, curriculum, and methods for teaching in the middle school. Required for certificate extension to middle school grades.

3

EDU 326 Elements of Public School Law

Basic study of school law as applied to the organization of education from the federal and state perspective. Special attention is focused on the teacher and the law with respect to tort liability, due process, rights and responsibilities of teachers, students and parents. Impact of court decisions on the school.

3

EDU 349 Educational Psychology

Areas of psychology utilized in the teaching and learning processes. Analyzing and interpreting scientific data related to individual differences, growth, learning, group processes, systematic assessment, measurement, and evaluation.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 225 or EDU 224

EDU 351 Classroom Management and Learning Principles

Examination of significant research in areas of human learning and motivation as they relate to effective instructional strategies. An investigation into how teachers can translate theories and research from such areas as achievement motivation, learner cognitive style, emotional climate of the classroom, concept learning, creativity, and problem-solving into constructive classroom action.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 349

EDU 355 Assessment & Instruction of Students with Learning & Behavior Disorders in Inclusive Ed Settings

Critical examination of students with special needs in inclusive educational settings with an emphasis on the connections between core curriculum, ongoing assessment, and varied instructional strategies. Principles, procedures, and the application of various assessment techniques will be discussed. Organization, development, implementation, modification, and evaluation of instruction across the curriculum will be presented.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 250

Corequisites

EDU 356

EDU 356 Practicum in Inclusive Education IV

This course is required for students enrolled in EDU 355 Assessment & Instruction of Students with Learning & Behavior Disorders in Inclusive Ed Settings. Students spend seven to eight weeks in a special education setting. Students will develop a Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA), Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) and Individual Education Plan (IEP) for a pupil.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 250

Corequisites

EDU 355

EDU 360 Developmental Disabilities

An examination of the etiology, characteristics, and psychological development associated with developmental disabilities. While focusing largely on mental retardation, the course is non-categorical in orientation. Particular attention is paid to techniques and strategies for integration of developmentally disabled children into the mainstream of education.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 250

EDU 376 Early Childhood Emergent Literacy

Designed to provide knowledge of emergent literacy (reading & writing) development and some early language development in children from birth to 8 year olds. Course also teaches methods and strategies for teaching literacy to all birth to 8 year olds to increase school readiness. Course is open to all Fredonia students interested in helping young children develop literacy skills.

3

EDU 380 Working with Children Outside the Classroom

In this service learning course, college students will serve as mentors for K-5 pupils outside the classroom (12-15 hours). Critical issues regarding working with youth, particularly in urban schools, will be addressed and explored through professional development sessions (3-6 hours).

1

EDU 390 Special Topics in Education: Curriculum and Instruction

Study of special areas in education not covered by existing courses, with special emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction. Content varies from semester to semester. Students should consult the appropriate online Course Offerings and department notices.

0-3

EDU 391 Special Topics in Education: Language, Learning, and Leadership

Study of special areas in education not covered by existing courses, with special emphasis on Language, Literacy, and Leadership. Content varies from semester to semester. Students should consult the appropriate online Course Offerings and department notices.

3

EDU 395 Belize Project Orientation

This 2 credit course is a pre-requisite for the Belize Service Learning Project (INED 499). It provides an orientation to the elementary schools, students and teachers in Belize and to Belizean culture in general. It prepares participants to work with cooperating teachers in Belizean schools. Participants design instructional activities and create educational materials that will be donated to cooperating schools and the Belizean Scouts Organization after INED 499. Open to all students in Early Childhood, Childhood, and Childhood Inclusive Education, Adolescence Education, Social Work, Communication Disorders, Music Education, Music Therapy, graduate students in the COE, and other interested students. (Students may take EDU 395 for their own enrichment without participating in the January trip to Belize.)

2

EDU 402 Teaching Mathematics in Inclusive Educational Settings

Content, curriculum, materials, and procedures in teaching mathematics in the elementary school based on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) recommendations and standards.

3

Prerequisites

MAED 302 and EDU 305 and EDU 313 and EDU 349

EDU 403 Teaching Science in Inclusive Educational Settings

Materials and procedures in a process-centered science curriculum. Investigation of new curricula illustrating guided discovery approach to teaching sciences.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 305 and EDU 313 and EDU 349

EDU 404 Teaching Social Studies in Inclusive Educational Settings

Curriculum, materials, and procedures in teaching social studies in the elementary school.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 305 and EDU 313 and EDU 349

EDU 405 Teaching Literacy in Inclusive Educational Settings

Candidates will explore and critique aspects of effective reading and writing programs for elementary and early childhood children who are in inclusive settings. Course content will enable candidates to review and select research-based materials, strategies, and assessments that promote learning to read and write and reading and writing to learn. Course connections to EDU 305 will enable candidates to reflect on and critique reading and writing curriculum practices that are culturally relevant and lead to successful literacy learning in balanced, comprehensive programs.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 305* and (EDU 276 or SCED 276 or MAED 276)

Cross Listed Courses

* Indicates that the course can be taken in the same semester

EDU 406 Literacy and Assessment in Inclusive Educational Settings

Candidates will demonstrate their understanding of literacy assessment and instruction by critically exploring assessments, instructional practices, and programs for diverse learners and struggling readers and writers in elementary and early childhood inclusive settings. Using case study and assessment results, candidates will develop and recommend effective, balanced strategies and approaches to literacy instruction that are culturally responsive and meet the needs of all students.

3

Prerequisites

(EDU 405*) and EDU 305* and EDU 313* and EDU 349 and (EDU 276 or MAED 276 or SSED 276)

Cross Listed Courses

* Indicates that the course can be taken in the same semester

EDU 412 Integrated Methods for Early Childhood Education

Prepares students to teach in early childhood classrooms. Information on the national and state learning standards in science, social studies, and the creative arts. Topics include constructivist curriculum planning, preparing the teaching/learning environment, the anti-bias curriculum, project work, authentic assessment, and the role of play in the early childhood classroom.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 315

Corequisites

EDU 432

EDU 416 Capstone Seminar - Advanced Study in Classroom Organization, Management, and Instruction

Focus on extending candidates' knowledge and skills in classroom management and organizational methods, as well as instructional strategies and content. The course also assists candidates in the successful completion of the applied teaching and learning project in their student teaching experiences.

3

EDU 417 Middle School (Grades 5-9) Methods in Mathematics

Principles, materials, and methods for teaching middle school (grades 5 to 9) mathematics. The course serves as the primary methods course for students pursuing initial certification in Middle Childhood Education - Mathematics Specialist.

3

EDU 419 Secondary School (Adolescence) Methods

Principles, materials, and methods for teaching English, foreign languages, mathematics, science, or social studies in the secondary school. Assignment to sections according to subject matter. Note: must be taken before senior student teaching. Required for Adolescence Education.

3

EDU 420 Student Teaching Grades 1-3

A field assignment to teach in Childhood Education. Assignments provided in grades 1 to 3; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Childhood Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 421 Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education - Pre-Kindergarten

A field assignment to teach in Early Childhood Education. Assignments in Pre-Kindergarten; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Early Childhood Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 422 Student Teaching Childhood: Grades 4-6

A field assignment to teach in Childhood Education. Assignments provided in grades 4 to 6; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Childhood Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the School of Education.

6

EDU 423 Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education - Kindergarten

A field assignment to teach in Early Childhood Education. Assignments in a kindergarten; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Early Childhood Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 424 Student Teaching in the Elementary School - Primary (Hamburg)

A field assignment to teach on the primary level in the elementary school. Open only to candidates accepted into the Fredonia-Hamburg Program. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

3

EDU 425 Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education - Grades 1 or 2

A field assignment to teach in Early Childhood Education. Assignments in a grade 1 or 2 classroom; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Early Childhood Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 426 Student Teaching in the Elementary School - Intermediate (Hamburg)

A field experience assignment to teach in the intermediate level in the elementary school. Open only to candidates accepted into the Fredonia-Hamburg Program. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

3

EDU 429 Student Teaching in Middle Childhood Education - Mathematics Specialist

A field assignment to teach middle school mathematics. Assignments provided in grades 5 through 9; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to students accepted into SUNY Fredonia's Middle Childhood Education - Mathematics Specialist Program.

15

Prerequisites

EDU 417 or MAED 417

EDU 430 Student Teaching Grades 7-12

A field assignment to teach in secondary education. Assignments provided by subject area in grades 7 through 12; arrangements made by Office of Field Experiences. Open only to students accepted in Adolescence Education Certification.

15

Prerequisites

EDU 419 or MAED 419 or SCED 419 or SSED 419

EDU 432 Home/School Partnerships in a Diverse Society

Prepares the preservice teacher with strategies for facilitating family involvement in the education process. The course will place emphasis on the skills of communication (both personal and written). Topics covered include: parent conferences, volunteers in the classroom, barriers to parent involvement and one-way and two-way communication strategies.

1.5-3

Corequisites

EDU 412

EDU 435 Student Teaching: Pre-K/Kindergarten

A field assignment to teach in Early Childhood Education. Assignments in Pre-Kindergarten or Kindergarten; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates majoring in Dual-Certification Early Childhood/Childhood Education who have been admitted to the professional sequence.

3-6

EDU 436 Student Teaching: Grades 1-3

A field assignment to teach in primary grades, 1-3. Assignments in grades 1, 2 or 3; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates majoring in Dual-Certification Early Childhood/Childhood Education who have been admitted to the professional sequence.

3-6

EDU 437 Student Teaching: Grades 4-6

A field assignment to teach in intermediate grades, 4-6. Assignments in grades 4, 5, or 6; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates majoring in Dual-Certification Early Childhood/Childhood Education who have been admitted to the professional sequence.

3-6

EDU 438 Student Teaching: PreK-Grade 2

Student Teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, clinical component of the teacher preparation program for State University of New York at Fredonia students seeking initial teacher certification. The primary purpose of the student teaching experience is to provide you with a carefully mentored experience to help you develop and enhance the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to positively impact student learning and development.

6

EDU 439 Student Teaching: Grades 3-6

Student Teaching is a full-semester, full-time, full-day, clinical component of the teacher preparation program for State University of New York at Fredonia students seeking initial teacher certification. The primary purpose of the student teaching experience is to provide you with a carefully mentored experience to help you develop and enhance the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to positively impact student learning and development.

6

EDU 440 Student Teaching Inclusive/Special Education: Grades 1-3

A field assignment to teach in Childhood Inclusive Education. Assignments provided in grades 1 - 3; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Childhood Inclusive Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 441 Student Teaching Inclusive/Special Education: Grades 4-6

A field assignment to teach in Childhood Inclusive Education. Assignments provided in grades 4 - 6; arrangements made by the Office of Field Experiences. Open only to candidates accepted in Childhood Inclusive Education. Prerequisites: Enrollment and satisfactory progress in professional education courses; ongoing recommendation of the College of Education.

6

EDU 480 Internship - Curriculum and Instruction

Participation in a professional, subject related experience, with emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction. The student must submit a proposal stating what the experience is, how it relates to their course of study, and how it will be monitored and evaluated. The instructor will be responsible for the supervision of the intern. The proposal must be approved one month in advance by the advisor, instructor, and chairperson prior to registration.

1-15

EDU 481 Internship: Language, Learning, and Leadership

Participation in a professional, subject related experience, with emphasis on Language, Learning, and Leadership. The student must submit a proposal stating what the experience is, how it relates to their course of study, and how it will be monitored and evaluated. The instructor will be responsible for the supervision of the intern. The proposal must be approved one month in advance by the advisor, instructor, and chairperson prior to registration.

1-15

EDU 490 Independent Study: Curriculum and Instruction

Study of a particular problem in education, with emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction. Periodic meetings with instructor and the writing of a substantial paper.

1-4

EDU 491 Independent Study: Language, Learning, and Leadership

Study of a particular problem in education, with emphasis on Language, Learning, and Leadership. Periodic meetings with instructor and the writing of a substantial paper.

3-15

EDU 501 Advanced Study: Child Psychology

Methods for observing and measuring child behavior. Principles of research in the study of children. Study of contemporary areas of concern in child development including psychological consequences of marital discord, day care, television, paternal behavior, and family size.

3

EDU 502 Psychology of Adolescence

Influence of physical, sexual, and social factors upon total personality during adolescence. Relationship to formation of attitudes toward self and others. Social, emotional, intellectual, and vocational adjustment demanded of youth in contemporary life.

3

EDU 503 Evaluation in the Schools

Practical applications of evaluation theory in the schools: preparation and use of teacher-made tests; selection, administration, and interpretation of standardized tests; the use of assessment data in school-related decision-making.

3

EDU 504 The Exceptional Learner

Introduces teachers to instructional approaches for meeting the needs of exceptional learners. Addresses practical considerations regarding placement options, instructional adaptations, and effective use of support services.

3

EDU 505 The Process of Writing: K-12

Examination of the writing process with emphasis on the theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of composition. Details the importance and role of audience, voice, focus, prewriting, conferencing, peer editing, assessment, purpose, and mechanics. Participants write in several modes as part of observation and study of their own composing strategies, including an investigation of the stage or step model of writing.

3

EDU 506 Introduction to Literacy Instruction

The course is designed to provide an overview of literacy (reading, writing, viewing, speaking, listening, thinking) as a developmental process. It includes models of literacy that support learning and instruction, as well as addressing issues concerning emergent literacy, planning and evaluation, and programs funded at the state and federal levels.

3

EDU 507 Group Processes in Education

Implications of individual group relationships for teachers and administrators with respect to more effective teaching, higher student motivation, leadership identification and development, school climate and organizational development.

3

EDU 508 Teaching Exceptional Learners in Inclusive Settings

Addresses evidence-based instructional approaches, curriculum adaptation, placement options, and effective use of support services for exceptional learners, with an emphasis on instructional approaches to support them in inclusive settings and in the general education curriculum.

3

EDU 509 Teaching of Thinking

Study of an overall framework of teaching of and about thinking and teacher behaviors which create classroom conditions for thinking. Basic approaches to the teaching of thinking skills are explored through current programs, systems, and resources.

3

EDU 513 Literacy in the Content Areas

The course explores reading and writing in discipline-specific areas including science, social studies, and mathematics. The course also places a strong emphasis on close reading of expository texts and analysis of test data as a tool for planning instruction.

3

EDU 514 Assessmentand Instruction of Diverse Learners I

Addresses proven formal and informal approaches to be used by educators and related services professionals in identifying and teaching exceptional learners, with an emphasis on measurement strategies that inform their effective instruction.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 508*

Cross Listed Courses

* Indicates that the course can be taken in the same semester

EDU 515 Dramatic Experiences in Elementary School

The course will examine the history of dramatic experiences in the K-6 public school system, including oral and dramatic traditions in cultures around the world. Children's/adolescent literature titles will be the catalyst to develop projects that include storytelling and dramatic activities.

3

EDU 516 Improving Educational Outcomes: Working with Children and Families from Poverty

This Linking Content to Pedagogy course provides an in-depth study of the culture of poverty (in contrast to middle class) using research-based frameworks. Candidates will explore characteristics of poverty and social class and relate these characteristics to academic readiness and success in order to develop classroom tools, interventions, and resources for use with P-12 children and their families.

3

EDU 517 Types of English Language Learners

In this special topics course, participants will have the chance to learn about the various "types" of English language learners (ELLs). Often, people assume that ELLs are children who just need to learn the English language and are in K-12 school settings. While this definition can be true, it is limited in its scope for its lack of recognizing the various influences and contexts in which people are and can be classified as ELLs. Further, not all ELLs have had or are in K-12 settings. Therefore, this course is designed to introduce students to the various types of ELLs. This may include all or most of the following: (a) long-term ELLs; (b) (im)migrants; (c) adults; and (d) refugees, newcomers and students with interrupted formal education (SIFE). The goal of this course is to introduce anyone interested in learning about these various "types" of ELLs to the defining characteristics of each group, to rectify any myths and misunderstandings about who ELLs are while digging into the controversial group labeling that can exist, and to examine and discover pertinent influences which may impact language acquisition and ELLs' ability to be included as full members of society (whether in school or workplace environments).

3

EDU 518 Second Language Acquisition and Development

This course will help teacher educators better understand second language acquisition (SLA) in order to help them with their lesson planning and delivery in instructing English language learners (ELLs). Students will become knowledgeable about the various social, psychological, and linguistic theories and approaches to SLA and be able to apply this knowledge to their teaching practices. This course will also explore first language acquisition, developmental stages of SLA, as well as present the various individual factors which help to explain differences between and within language learners. Since ELLs are diverse, and their language learning needs are specific to themselves, educators must understand the various means and ways in which languages are learned and acquired in order to be reflective, responsive practitioners.

3

EDU 519 Curriculum Theory for the Second Language Classroom - ESL I

Discusses basic curriculum theory, providing models of curriculum development and their application to Pre K-12 classrooms, with an emphasis on constructivist, student-centered theories. Emphasizes basic curriculum theory for the English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom, providing an analysis of curriculum models for ESL and bilingual education. Basic methods of ESL are used, as students apply theory to classroom practice through research and projects. N.Y.S.E.D. Standards for ESL and the N.Y.S.E.D. ELA Standards applied to ELL students provide the basis for curriculum work. Infuses technology and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) in methodology.

3

Corequisites

EDU 521

EDU 520 Curriculum Framework Theory/Development

Core graduate course for the Curriculum and Instruction master's degree specialization explores the people and changes impacting the history of curriculum in the U. S. Students will develop a usable curriculum/instructional framework following acceptable curriculum development practice.

3

EDU 521 Practicum in TESOL I

Required for students enrolled in EDU 519 Curriculum Theory for the Second Language Classroom-ESL 1. Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 519

EDU 525 Curriculum Framework Integration/Innovation

Builds on EDU 520. Curriculum issues and development course, students analyze current developments in the field of curriculum and instruction. Students develop an innovative curriculum framework integrating many content frameworks and innovative techniques.

3

EDU 526 Middle School Curriculum

Study of the philosophy, organization, and curriculum of the middle school. Emphasis on the role of the teacher in the middle school. Research and experimental models are examined.

3

EDU 528 Technology in the Schools

The course is designed to introduce education personnel to the techniques and equipment involved in the use and development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A preliminary introduction to the microcomputer will be a part of the course. The role of both CAI and computer-managed instruction will be explored, including the possibilities of record management, analysis of student performance, and the development of original CAI materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of "high level, user- friendly" languages such as PILOT and LOGO.

3

EDU 529 Proactive Approaches to Classroom Management in Inclusive Settings

Focus on research-based positive approaches to the prevention of and intervention on academic and social challenges of P-12 students with disabilities. Principles of classroom structure and organization, classroom management, positive proactive behavior management, and school-wide discipline plans are emphasized, with a basis in current research.

3

Cross Listed Courses

EDU 508 and EDU 514

EDU 530 Assessment and Instruction of Diverse Learners II

Case study-based approach to issues of instructional planning, instructional delivery, analysis of student performance, and teacher reflection and response. Incorporates the "Planning, Instructing, Reflecting, Responding model" adopted by Fredonia's Professional Education Unit.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 508 and EDU 514

EDU 531 Philosophy of Education

This course will provide candidates in a variety of content areas with the opportunity to explore the philosophical, historical, cultural and social foundations of educational thought relevant to their areas of pedagogical focus.

3

EDU 535 School and Society

Analysis of the school in relation to other socializing influences. Examines cultural change and its effect upon education; the school in relation to specific problems of changing American communities; and research on teaching as an occupation.

3

EDU 536 Adolescent Literacies, Literature and Technology

The course provides an overview of multiple literacies associated with adolescents, including the theory and research base. It examines young adult literature from the perspectives of critical literacy and censorship, and it explores media literacy and technology, with a special emphasis on computers and writing. The course also develops means for assisting struggling adolescent readers, especially those from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

3

EDU 538 Cultural Literature

The course takes a transcultural/global approach to the promotion of literacy. Focusing on juvenile and children's literature - as well as on literature applicable to adolescents - the course exposes course participants to world literature. Within an in-depth global exploration of culture and values, students will glean intercultural awareness, stretching literacy beyond U.S. national borders. Using sound instructional practice and theory, participants will read novels written by international child protagonists. Participants will generate annotated bibliographies that will enrich classroom libraries and promote literacy at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

3

EDU 539 Current Issues and Problems in Education

Addresses identification, definition, and analysis of problems and issues facing education today; current criticisms of public schools; responsibilities of the schools; questions of curriculum development; and how well schools are teaching basic skills.

3

EDU 540 Content Area English as a Second Language

This course explores Sheltered English Instruction by studying and using the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) as a model for sheltered instruction. Participants in the course will learn how to deliver high-quality and effective sheltered instruction and how to create instructional materials using this model. The ultimate goal of this course is to explore the different content areas in both school and the work place to be able to translate instruction into meaningful learning. Studying sheltered instruction offers teacher candidates a model for lesson planning and implementation that provides English learners with access to grade-level content standards. Emphasis will be placed on the academic language demands required by the state of New York as articulated in the Common Core and English Language Proficiency Standards documents. This course has a co-requisite.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 519

Corequisites

EDU 541

EDU 541 Practicum in TESOL II

Required for students enrolled in EDU 540 Content Area English as a Second Language. Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 540

EDU 542 Evidence-Based Practices for Inclusive Settings

Evidence-Based Practices for Inclusive Settings meets new legislative and legal mandates for educators to provide their students with "scientifically-based" instructional practices for improving academic and behavioral performance. This course will help practitioners to link their respective academic "content" with"evidence-based" pedagogical practices.

3

EDU 543 Education for Gifted and Talented Students

Focuses on development and implementation of educational programs for optimum growth of gifted/talented students, inclusive of curriculum content; organization of special schools and classes; teaching materials and methods; and the evaluation and administrative adjustments.

3

EDU 544 Secondary School (Adolescence) Curriculum

Study of secondary curriculum, inclusive of new mandates; emerging practices; varied viewpoints; relevant research; programs; and the roles of classroom teacher and school administrator in curriculum development.

3

EDU 545 History of American Education

Historical interpretation of American education. Characteristics of American colonial education and significant developments in American elementary, secondary, and higher education during the 19th and 20th centuries.

3

EDU 546 Models of Classroom Management

Designed to expand traditional understanding of classroom management that focuses on discipline and behavioral problems. The course follows a comprehensive classroom management approach, focusing on areas of knowledge and skills that teachers need in order to be effective classroom managers.

3

EDU 548 Practicum in International Teaching

The course provides an opportunity to expand and practice teaching skills in an international setting. Participants will gain information on an educational system different from their own, gain experiences with the traditions and cultural values of the host country, and participate in classrooms where they can observe, assist, and teach. On-site U.S. faculty will assign readings to complement the practical experiences and will lead discussion seminars on topics and themes associated with the international experience.

3

EDU 551 Foundations of Teaching Indigenous Languages: Theory, History, Programs

Foundations of Teaching Indigenous Languages: Theory, History, Programs provides the basic history, theories, issues, and concepts related to teaching Indigenous languages. This course will cover varieties of language reclamation models, history, policy and politics of Indigenous language, as well as issues in teaching and learning Indigenous languages. This course focuses both on international and national perspectives by providing examples of endangered and reclaimed languages from around the world. This course flows from the topic of language endangerment to language reclamation in the Americas to a local New York perspective on indigenous language endangerment/reclamation. Topics such as policies and politics, linguistic human rights, and new domains for Indigenous languages will be a focus of this course.

3

EDU 552 Introduction to Literacy Assessment

The course investigates the nature and process of literacy assessment, with an eye to the diagnosis of literacy difficulties. The course requires Candidates to develop competence in using a wide variety of literacy assessments and analyzing data in order to identify reading and writing problems.

3

EDU 553 Citizenship Education: Moral-Legal Education

Curriculum planning and revision, kindergarten through twelfth grade, as it relates to the moral-legal dilemmas facing teachers and students today. Elements include: (1) law-related education; (2) various theoretical positions regarding moral development; (3) moral dilemmas (case studies) drawn from schools; and (4) curricular implications and revisions needed.

3

EDU 555 Methods of Bilingual Education

Reviews, discusses, and analyzes teaching methods and techniques used in core subject areas (mathematics, science, and social studies) in bilingual education classrooms in the United States. Assessment strategies as integral parts of teaching methodology are discussed (e.g., portfolios will develop and teach reading and/or writing lessons using strategies, peer groups and self-assessments). Emphasis is on methods and techniques using the language in which the bilingual extension is sought. The course includes suggestions for coordination with ESL content area instruction. Students produce and carry out lessons in the various subject areas. Required course for candidates pursuing a New York State Bilingual Education Extension; recommended for teachers working with English Language Learners.

3

EDU 556 Teaching Language Arts in Spanish

Focuses on teaching approaches and methodology used in the development of literacy skills by Spanish speaking students in the U.S. Emphasizes the understanding of the active interaction of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in the process of acquiring and mastering communication skills. Reviews and analyzes current technology and curricular materials used to teach the language arts. Students will develop and teach reading and/or writing lessons using course materials. Required for teachers pursuing a New York State Bilingual Education extension.

3

EDU 557 Methods of Instruction and Assessment for Teaching Indigenous Languages

Methods of Instruction for Teaching Indigenous Languages provides students with the opportunity to learn about the various methods and practices related to teaching Indigenous/endangered and less commonly taught languages. Participants will learn about program models and methods which have been used in successful language reclamation situations, as well as practices which are currently being used today for those languages which are considered endangered and in need of reclamation. Models discussed will include, but are not limited to, the following: immersion, intergenerational and Master-Apprentice models, bi/multilingual programs, summer institutes, and other school or community-based initiatives used by Indigenous People throughout the United States and the world.

3

EDU 561 Contemporary Issues in Parent/Teacher Relationships

Focuses on building successful partnerships with families with diverse structures. Identifies models of family involvement in schools; strategies for increasing family involvement in classrooms; current educational mandates; implications for schools; and relevant research.

3

EDU 562 Infant Development and Education

Focuses on nutritional and psychological influences on prenatal, infant, and toddler growth and development, inclusive of current research in infant development; childbirth; breastfeeding; infant simulation; intellectual development; attachment behavior; and infants in group care.

3

EDU 563 Cultural Perspectives

Explores cultural awareness and diversity-related issues both in classrooms and the workplace, with a social sciences approach. Uses ethnographic investigations, document-based analysis, and cultural instruments to explore the diverse reality of today's classrooms and schools. Explores constructivist, student-centered, and equitable learning formats.

3

EDU 564 Linguistics for ESL Educators

Educating English language learners (ELLs) is complex, and having a further understanding of linguistics will help teacher educators to enhance their lesson planning and delivery in instructing ELLs of various backgrounds. Educational professionals will most likely encounter situations where having familiarity with aspects of linguistics will better enable one to practice one’s profession. This course presents the conceptual foundations of linguistics, examines structural/functional properties of language, and discusses the rules and principles which govern natural language (e.g., morphology, phonetics, phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics). Other aspects of linguistics, such as language change, language processing (psycholinguistics) and elements of linguistics which impact language acquisition will also be explored. Further, the concept of Academic Language (AL) is discussed and the implications of AL on teaching practices is explored in relation to ELLs across the core content areas. Overall, this course will explore the core areas of linguistics, help educators “do linguistics” and make linguistics applicable to a language learning classroom via activities, exercises, and projects. Students will be able to apply this new linguistic knowledge to their teaching practices, particularly when working with ELLs.

3

EDU 565 Language and Learning: Psycho- and Sociolinguistic Considerations for Educators of ELL Students

This course will help teacher educators in understanding how language is used and how language functions both within and outside of classroom walls. The course will investigate topics such as globalization and the relationship between language and social settings, including language and gender, identity, ethnicity, and culture. The course will study how language is used globally, in a variety of local/global situations (e.g., World English, language variation), and will examine language use critically (e.g., power, discourse, policy). A wide range of topics in this course will address many of the sociolinguistic phenomena described above, and may include the following: heritage language maintenance, language contact, investment, imagined communities, dialects and idiolects, discourse, language policy, digital literacies, and language socialization. This course will help future educators distinguish and form opinions on these key topics, and discover how sociopolitical, sociocultural, and sociolinguistic elements can affect language learning and language use in and outside of the classroom. Educators will come to understand the broad spectrum of English language in use, the complexities associated with the multiple varieties of English, and how this may impact their classroom in order to be reflective, responsive practitioners.

3

EDU 567 Practicum in TESOL III

Required for students enrolled in EDU 569 Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners (ELLs). Students will complete 25 hours of clinical field experience in an elementary, secondary or adult classroom, in traditional and/or non-traditional settings, to work closely with English language learners in some capacity.

0

Corequisites

EDU 569

EDU 568 Foundations of Bilingual Education

This course provides the basic theories, issues, and concepts related to teaching in culturally diverse classrooms where students’ first language is not English. Focuses on U.S. bilingual education in terms of historical, theoretical, and practice/methods used in schools. This course explores bilingual education from the 1960s to the present, Federal legislation (Title VII, Title III), the No Child Left Behind Act, Supreme and lower court decisions, state legislation, Bilingual Special Education, and other legal aspects. Emphasis is placed on the design and effectiveness of a variety of bilingual education program models such as one-way and two-way immersion, indigenous language immersion, and other program models of bilingual education. Participants apply knowledge of the relevant federal and state standards documents pertaining to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse populations such as the NYS Bilingual Common Core Standards, and conduct independent field and library research.

3

EDU 569 Assessment and Evaluation of English Language Learners (ELLs)

This course allows participants to view current school-based assessments through psychometric and socio-cultural models of assessment focusing on how schools measure language and achievement for ELLs. Through a unified theory of construct validity, participants will identify the purpose, instrument, method, and the use of assessments and evaluations most appropriate and valid for ELLs. This course explores relationships of assessment to instruction, data driven instruction (DDI), consequences of assessments, test score interpretation, state and federal assessment policies, and those assessments unique for ELLs. Teacher candidates learn how to develop assessment instruments aligned with Bilingual Common Core and English Language Proficiency Standards as well as develop a conceptual understanding of basic psychometric concepts (grade level equivalent, percentile rank, cut-off scores, standard error of measurement) and how best to apply these concepts in schools with ELLs. This course has a co-requisite 25-hour field placement practicum.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 519

Corequisites

EDU 567

EDU 570 Using Educational Research to Improve Instruction

Assists educational practitioners to become knowledgeable consumers of research and evaluation reports by helping them critically analyze and evaluate research. It examines the nature of reasoning in educational research, the use of measurement procedures in quantifying traits, the role of design in testing hypotheses, the role of statistics in analyzing data, and the limitations inherent in generalizing the results of research studies. Should be taken in the first 9 hours of graduate study.

3

EDU 574 Multicultural Children's Literature & Technology

The course provides an overview of children's literature from the perspectives of genre, critical literacy, censorship, readability, instructional resource, and multiculturalism. The course also examines literature in non-print forms both for reading and as a product of student writing. The course emphasis is on using a variety of materials and multicultural texts to assist student readers and writers from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds

3

EDU 576 Practicum in Literacy for All Students

The course is a field-based practicum taken at the same time as the Social Foundations of Literacy course. It provides Candidates with a minimum of 25 hours of practicum in intervention and coaching within formal educational settings wherein Candidates apply and practice what they learn in the co-requisite course about identifying ad assisting all types of diverse students.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 552

Corequisites

EDU 579

EDU 579 Foundations of Literacy

The course presents knowledge about basic psychological and social foundations of reading, writing, spelling, speaking, listening, and viewing. It addresses linguistic, cognitive, psychological, and sociological components that are essential for Candidates to know in order to provide literacy instruction and intervention to the increasingly diverse group of learners in today's classrooms. The course also prepares Candidates to take the New York State Content Specialty Test (CST) for Literacy.

3

EDU 580 Teaching Grades 7-12

Practical suggestions for teacher working in secondary school, with a focus on materials and teaching procedures for specific units of work such as: teaching as problem-solving, evaluation strategies, instructional techniques, and recent developments in educational thinking and practice that have affected the curriculum. Special attention to selected topics according to needs and interest of participants. Note: A selected area is to be designated: General, English, Mathematics, Foreign Languages, Science, or Social Studies.

3

EDU 583 Literacy Interventionist Practicum I

The course is one of four practicum courses to train Candidates as reading specialists who provide reading intervention through individualized, assessment-based and learner-orientated instruction. Candidates learn to administer literacy assessments, track results, and use the data to develop interventions, write lesson plans, and work with struggling readers.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 506 and EDU 552

EDU 585 Adolescent Literature

The course provides an overview of critical issues on various types of young adult literature, including forms of media that represent literature. Candidates will examine historical and contemporary literature, both fiction and non-fiction. They will also identify and select appropriate reading materials, and teaching strategies to meet diverse needs of adolescent students, based on socio-cultural and academic backgrounds.

1.5

EDU 588 Learning to Write: Pre K - Grade 6

Candidates engage interactively in various activities, discussions and readings about the development of writing skills and strategies in Pre K - 6. Current state standards, text types, appropriate teaching strategies for diverse learners, and assessment will be addressed.

3

EDU 589 Writing in the Middle and Secondary Schools

Candidates engage interactively in various activities, discussions and readings about the development of writing skills and strategies in secondary schools. Current state standards, text types, appropriate teaching strategies for diverse learners, and assessment will be discussed.

3

EDU 591 Special Topics: Curriculum and Instruction

In-depth exploration of selected topics in professional education, with emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction. Principal focus of the course varies.

3

EDU 592 Special Topics: Language, Learning, and Leadership

In-depth exploration of selected topics in professional education, with emphasis on Language, Learning, and Leadership. Principal focus of the course varies.

3

EDU 598 Special Education Considerations for Assessment of English Language Learners

This course presents current research in the identification of English Language Learners (ELLs) with special needs. The main focus of this course is the use of appropriate language development and disability. Participants will make appropriate intervention, referral, and placement decisions regarding ELLs. Participants will also be able to list key legal restraints on assessing ELLs for Special Education placements. A broad context of legal, historical, sociopolitical and out of school factors (OSFs) affecting the schooling of culturally and linguistically diverse students will be explored. All participants will develop a portfolio of assessment methods for the use in describing student performance in both content areas and language development before diagnosis.

3

EDU 599 edTPA Development and Support

This variable credit course is offered as a support course for post-baccalaureate applicants who need to complete all or part of the Education Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA) for Initial Teacher Certification in New York State. Enrollees will be provided with supports sanctioned by the Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning, and Equity (SCALE) in completing edTPA and submitting to Pearson for evaluation. Enrollees planning to submit an entire edTPA will enroll for three credits, whereas those who enroll to resubmit a single task for edTPA will enroll for one credit.

1-3

EDU 601 Issues, Trends, and Research in Autism

This course provides an overview of the needs and education of children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Among the areas explored in this course are: a review of the historical background; causes and diagnosis; signs, symptoms, and characteristics; strategies in education, social interactions, and language development; education-related laws and rights; impact on family dynamics and parent support. In addition the course will include current trends pertaining to Autism Spectrum Disorder.

3

EDU 603 Issues, Trends, and Research in Elementary (Childhood) Science

Focuses on issues, trends, and research in teaching science in the elementary school. Emphasis on individual readings and seminar discussions, using primary and secondary sources of research.

3

EDU 605 Issues, Trends, and Research in Elementary (Childhood) Language

Focuses on the structure and organization of English language arts programs; examination of past and current research; and evaluation of current programs. Emphasis on individual readings and seminar discussions, using primary and secondary sources of research.

3

EDU 611 Advanced Seminar in Elementary Education

Individual research on problems of special interest, under the guidance of one or more faculty members.

3

EDU 613 Literacy Interventionist Practicum II

The course is the another of four practicum courses to train Candidates as reading specialists who provide reading intervention through individualized, assessment- based and learner-orientated instruction. Candidates move to mastery of interventionist skills as the course emphasizes impact on student learning. Candidates also practice their literacy coaching and leadership skills with classroom teachers and parents.

3

Prerequisites

(EDU 552 or EDU 652) and (EDU 554 or EDU 653) and EDU 583

EDU 614 Principles of School Administration and Leadership

The first level administrative course is designed to provide students with an introduction to school leadership theory and practice and the structure of education at the local, state and national level. The role of the administrator as a service agent for instruction and his/her function as the coordinator of school programs will be emphasized. Students will construct their perception of the role of the principal with an emphasis on the diverse and sometimes conflicting responsibilities. The paradox of the principalship, the need to be both an effective leader and manager, will be emphasized.

3

EDU 615 School Building Leader

The course explores the nature, responsibilities, and developing status of elementary and secondary principals and supervisors. The course is designed to provide an exploration of the issues of school culture, leadership, change theory, and data analysis as they relate to school leadership in P-12 education. Course content will focus on creating a culture of learning, investigating the elements of effective leadership, and planning for school improvement.

3

EDU 616 Supervision I: Theory/Practice

The course is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of supervision. Course content will focus on developing the skills an effective supervisor uses in recruiting, selecting, observing, evaluating, and conferencing with teachers in order to improve instruction. In addition, students will explore models of effective teaching and critically review laws, policies, and administrative regulations regarding teacher supervision and evaluation.

3

EDU 617 Supervision II: Supervision to Improve Instruction

The course provides an overview of the theory and practice of supervising instructional programs with an emphasis on reviewing data and revising curriculum to improve student outcomes. Course content focuses on developing the skills an effective supervisor uses in organizing and working with groups to improve instruction. The role of the school leader in building learning communities that support instructional improvement will be emphasized. The course content and activities will focus on the curriculum revision process with an emphasis on the role of standards, best practice, professional development and assessment. Students will review the history of curriculum in the United States. In addition the need for curriculum to be responsive to the special needs presented by students' background will be investigated.

3

EDU 618 Internship I: Educational Leadership

The field experience provides the opportunity to directly participate in the activities related to the functions of a school administrator/supervisor/leader in a school district. Candidates attend seminars to discuss leadership issues and explore topics raised by their experiences in the field.

3-6

EDU 619 Internship II: Educational Leadership

The field experience provides the continuing opportunity to directly participate in the activities related to the functions of a school administrator/supervisor/leader with an emphasis on community, district policy, board of education, legislation, evaluation and communication. Candidates attend seminars to discuss leadership issues and explore topics raised by their experiences in the field.

3

EDU 620 Public School Finance

The course focuses on the factors associated with the financial support of public education at the local, state and national levels. The analysis and study of legislation, Commissioner's Decisions, Board of Cooperative Education (BOCES) and regulations as they pertain to the support of programs that lead to the development of local budgets as an educational objective of the school district, Board of Education and the community will be studied.

3

EDU 623 Advanced Literacy Assessment

The course is a continuation of EDU 552, the first assessment course. This course requires Candidates to develop competence in using and analyzing the results of more formalized and norm-referenced assessments such as the Peabody and Woodcock Johnson. The course also enables the Candidates to develop their literacy coaching skills as they assist teachers and others with data analysis and assessment issues.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 552

EDU 624 Contemporary Problems in School Leadership

The course is devoted to the intensive study of selected current or emerging problems in administration, supervision and leadership. The course will explore significant issues involving: the Politics of Education; studies in Administrative Leadership; School - Community Relations; Collective Negotiations; School Personnel; Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment.

3

EDU 625 Early Childhood Curriculum

Focuses on educational experiences for children; parent involvement; health, psychological, and social services; planning and adaptation of facilities; utilization of materials and equipment; and development of internal program evaluation.

3

EDU 626 Public School Law

The course is devoted to the study of law and the principles of law as they apply to organization and administration of education at the local, state and national levels. Special attention to the laws, rules, regulations and court decisions that influence district employees, policy, administrative operations and the community will be emphasized. The use of negotiation strategies to reach agreement will be studied.

3

EDU 628 Reading Specialist Practicum

EDU 628 is a field-based practicum taken as a co-requisite with the EDU 579 Social Foundations of Literacy course. It provides Candidates in the Birth to Grade 12 Literacy Program with a minimum of 25 hours of practicum in intervention and coaching within formal educational settings wherein Candidates apply and practice what they learn in the co-requisite course about identifying and assisting all types of diverse students.

1

Prerequisites

EDU 552

Corequisites

EDU 579

EDU 629 Issues, Trends, and Research in Early Childhood Education

Explores basic issues in early childhood education, current trends, and past and current research.

3

EDU 630 Educational Administration Special Topics

Advanced course devoted to the analysis of one topic, which may be selected from the following: Creating Safe and Productive Schools, The Politics of Education, Studies in Administrative Leadership, School-Community Relations, Collective Negotiations, School Personnel Administration, Administering Innovation Programs, or Management Objectives.

3

EDU 635 Curriculum Development in Social Studies Education

Investigates basic principles in curriculum development in elementary social studies. Examines current social studies curricula and materials. Students develop social studies curriculum projects of special interest.

3

EDU 636 Issues, Trends, and Research in Elementary School Social Studies

Examines the structure and organization of social studies programs. Focuses on past and current issues, trends, and research in social studies education; and evaluation of current social studies programs.

3

EDU 640 Issues, Trends, and Research in Elementary (Childhood) Mathematics

Examines issues and trends in elementary school mathematics programs. Reviews components of modern programs in elementary school mathematics, based on an examination of experimental programs, trends, and current materials. Focuses on content, instructional materials, procedures, and evaluation of current programs.

3

EDU 642 Activity-Oriented Elementary Mathematics

Prepares teachers to teach elementary mathematics through laboratory and learner-oriented activities. Class members prepare laboratory materials, kits, and activity-type lessons for their own classrooms.

3

EDU 643 Math Assessment in Support of All Learners

Investigation and interpretation of assessment strategies and evaluation methods in mathematics education. Includes the study of current state assessments in mathematics as well as the design and use of criteria to evaluate performance in mathematics and their application to understanding and diagnosing learning difficulties in mathematics. Examines the role of assessment in making instructional decisions. Current research on mathematics assessment is also examined.

3

EDU 651 Issues and Research in Literacy

The course provides Candidates with an opportunity to analyze issues in the field of literacy and the research connected to them. The course is also the pre-requisite to the Literacy Program capstone project course and requires Candidates to select their capstone topic and write a proposal for that project.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 570 and EDU 583 and EDU 652

EDU 655 Clinical Applications of Literacy Instruction

In the third clinical course, candidates apply multiple literacy and instructional techniques to enhance student's decoding, comprehension, and writing. The course addresses candidates in both elementary and secondary literacy programs.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 583 and EDU 613

EDU 659 Master's Thesis/Project in Literacy

The course is the capstone for the graduate literacy program and is designed to help Candidates refine their skills in the analysis and evaluation of research and the process of conducting educational research. Candidates should have completed at least 27 credit hours of their program, including EDU 651 or EDU 660, before registering for the course.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 570 or EDU 651 or EDU 660

EDU 660 Conducting Educational Research

This course will help prepare TESOL educators understand the various functions, benefits of, and uses for educational research and is a part of the three-course sequence for the College of Education (COE) as defined by the COE's Master's Project Handbook. Completing this course will further help TESOL candidates better design research projects suitable to the field and are to be constructed and created at the high standard to which students are held accountable. The research projects developed in this course should help further the field of education, particularly as related to TESOL (both teaching and learning). This course will scaffold students who have learned how to synthesize research from EDU 570 through the stages of designing a research proposal, thus preparing them for the final stages of their degree wherein students successfully complete their own Master's project or thesis in EDU 690. This knowledge will help advance TESOL candidates into becoming scholarly teachers who are able to reflect on their core educational values, continually engage in their own learning process, and know how to approach issues, concerns or problems within their school community.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 570

EDU 662 Policy Development, Politics and Ethical Practices

The course is specifically developed for candidates interested in the School District Leadership Certificate. Candidates must have completed all sections of the School Building Leadership requirements. Emphasis on school district policy development, its legal references, local, state, judicial and federal influences and regional implications on personnel, students and community and the board of education will be explored. Political entities that influence administrative and board of education decisions will be explored. The ethical dilemmas between what is legal and what is ethical will be researched and rational positions developed.

3

EDU 664 Governance, Media and Crisis Management

The course is specifically developed for candidates interested in the School District Leadership Certificate. Candidates must have completed all sections of the School Building Leadership requirements. Emphasis on central office administration, coordination of other municipal entities, local, state and federal regulatory agencies will be studied. Board of education/central administration coordination and communication, evaluation and planning will be studied with emphasis on positive district communication, coordination and public/taxpayer relations. The study of and the implementation of district crisis plans and adherence will also be studied.

3

EDU 670 Independent Study: Curriculum and Instruction

Provides advanced graduate students the opportunity to work individually on problems of special concern not otherwise available through regular course offerings under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction.

1-12

EDU 671 ESOL/BE Practicum & Supervision 20 Day

This course provides classroom instruction and field experience for educators of English language learners. It provides a supervised student teaching experience for graduate students who are already certified in an approved area of education (20 day placement) and for those graduate students who are earning their initial certification in TESOL pre-K-12 (40 day placement). Students are placed in an approved ESL/BE classroom at a grade level appropriate to ensuring they have experience across the pre-K-12 levels. All effort will be made to place those students already holding an early childhood or childhood certificate in a middle school or secondary school (grades 5-12) and students already holding a middle school or adolescent certificate in an elementary school setting (grades K-6). The field placement shall be for five days per week until your placement requirements have been fulfilled. This means for those students with prior certification, a 20 day placement is required. For those with no prior teaching certification, a 40 day placement is required. Classroom theory is applied to field practice. Students will be observed by a field supervisor a minimum of two times for a 20 day placement and three times for a 40 day placement.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 518 and EDU 519 and EDU 540 and EDU 568 and EDU 569

EDU 672 Independent Study: Language, Learning, and Leadership

Provides advanced graduate students the opportunity to work individually on problems of special concern not otherwise available through regular course offerings under the direction of a qualified faculty member. Emphasis on Language, Learning, and Leadership.

1-12

EDU 673 ESOL/BE Practicum &Supervision (40 day)

This course provides classroom instruction and field experience for educators of English language learners. It provides a supervised student teaching experience for graduate students who are already certified in an approved area of education (20 day placement) and for those graduate students who are earning their initial certification in TESOL pre-K-12 (40 day placement). Students are placed in an approved ESL/BE classroom at a grade level appropriate to ensuring they have experience across the pre-K-12 levels. All effort will be made to place those students already holding an early childhood or childhood certificate in a middle school or secondary school (grades 5-12) and students already holding a middle school or adolescent certificate in an elementary school setting (grades K-6). The field placement shall be for five days per week until your placement requirements have been fulfilled. This means for those students with prior certification, a 20 day placement is required. For those with no prior teaching certification, a 40 day placement is required. Classroom theory is applied to field practice. Students will be observed by a field supervisor a minimum of two times for a 20 day placement and three times for a 40 day placement.

3

Prerequisites

EDU 518 and EDU 519 and EDU 540 and EDU 568 and EDU 569

EDU 674 Bilingual Education (BE) Practicum & Supervision- 20 Day

This course provides classroom instruction and field experience for educators of English language learners. It provides a supervised student teaching experience for graduate students who are already certified in an approved area of education (20 day placement ) and for those graduate students who are earning their initial certificat ion in TESOL pre-K-12 (40 day placement). Students are placed in an approved ESL/BE classroom at a grade level appropriate to ensuring they have experience across the pre-K-12 levels. All effort will be made to place those students already holding an early childhood or childhood certificate in a middle school or secondary school (grades 5-12) and students already holding a middle school or adolescent certificate in an elementary school setting (grades K-6). The field placement shall be for five days per week until your placement requirements have been fulfilled. This means for those students with prior certification, a 20 day placement is required. For those with no prior teaching certification, a 40 day placement is required. Classroom theory is applied to field practice. Students will be observed by a field supervisor a minimum of two times for a 20 day placement and three times for a 40 day placement.

3

EDU 675 Teaching Indigenous Languages, preK-12, Practicum & Supervision- 20 Day

This course provides classroom instruction and field experience for candidates pursuing the CAS- Teaching Indigenous Language preK-12. It provides a supervised student teaching experience for graduate students who are already certified in an approved area of education (20 day placement). Students are placed in an approved Indigenous Language learning setting at a grade level appropriate to ensuring they have experience across the pre-K-12 levels. The field placement shall be for five days per week until your placement requirements have been fulfilled. This means for those students with prior certification, a 20 day placement is required. Classroom theory is applied to field practice. Students will be observed by a field supervisor a minimum of two times for a 20 day placement.

3

EDU 680 Master's Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination is one of the capstone options for candidates in the Curriculum and Instruction, Literacy Education: Birth-Grade 6, and Literacy Education: Grades 5-12 programs. It is a three-part, intensive written examination in the areas of education research, foundational studies (psychology, sociology, exceptionality, and diversity), and content area pedagogy. Examinations are tentatively administered on the first Saturday of December, March, and August, but examination dates are subject to change. The course is graded S/U and may be repeated once if a grade of U is earned. Prerequisite: Enrollment in final semester of graduate study or approval of the Dean of the College of Education.

0

EDU 690 Master's Thesis/Project

Congratulations! You have reached the end of the research sequence courses as defined by SUNY Fredonia's College of Education (COE). Prerequisites for enrollment in this class include 30 credit hours in your program of study and a grade of B or better in EDU 660. TESOL students have unique requirements for this final capstone course as defined by the COE's Master's Project Handbook. Therefore, EDU 690 is offered primarily as a structured independent study where students, with guidance, complete their approved Master's Research Project independently. Students will make appointments with the professor as necessary. Students entering the class without an approved EDU 660 or Human Subjects Review (HSR) proposal must meet with the professor every week until your proposal is approved by the professor. The primary goal of this course is to enable TESOL candidates to develop and complete your capstone project/thesis while learning skills and being provided with resources and support. Students will design and complete a high quality project/thesis. Students will either continue their work in 660 or will develop an exhaustive literature review and a hypothesis/problem area/research question(s) to be examined, and design a methods section. Depending on which option (curriculum project/action research/master's thesis) will determine the remaining requirements, but students will be obliged to meet all expectations outlined in the COE Master's Project Handbook. You will be required to disseminate your findings/project to an approved conference (e.g., SUNY Fredonia's Research Expo is a great place to start).

3-6

Prerequisites

EDU 660

EDU 691 Master's Thesis/Project

Research involving the preparation of a project, essay, or thesis.

3-6

EDU 695

Graduate students are required to remain continuously enrolled until completion of thesis/capstone work in order to allow continuing usage of university resources and to accurately account for faculty involvement.

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